Hurricane Irma's Power Might Reveal Future of Atlantic Storms

Fri Sep 8, 2017
A climate modeler, Johns Hopkins professor Dr. Anand Gnanadesikan looks at the atmospheric and oceanic circulation of the tropics, including how changes in circulation can affect hurricane formation. Irma “is right now the most extreme Atlantic hurricane on record. Some of the most intense hurricanes ever seen have been seen in the past few years. The predictions are that global warming will reduce the overall number of hurricanes, but increase the most intense hurricanes.”Video Transcript:Newscaster: Irma has made it to category 5.Graphics: Irma is the most powerful hurricane ever recorded in the Atlantic.Graphics: Anand Gnanadesikan, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins Climate ScientistGnanadesikan: It is right now the most extreme Atlantic hurricane on record. Some of the most intense hurricanes ever seen have been seen in the last few years.Graphics: Scientists who study climate change are investigating a surprise theory. They think that rising temperatures could lead to much stronger storms, but there may be far fewer of them.Gnanadesikan: The predictions are that global warming will reduce the overall number of hurricanes but increase the most intense hurricanes.Graphics: That could mean more storms like Irma that leave destruction and death in their wake.(Johns Hopkins University logo)Video by: Johns Hopkins Office of Communications video@jhu.edu Producer/Editor - Len Turner